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Coronavirus COVID-19 - BREAKING NEWS!!!
#41
Stay Safe from Coronavirus Scams:

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#42
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Quote: 
The company [Only registered and activated users can see links Click here to register] that it will highlight special announcements like school closures, travel restrictions, event cancellation or stay-at-home guidelines from those entities on its search results. There are two ways for websites to be featured in Search: adding structured data to their web pages or submitting COVID-19 announcements in Search Console.
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#43
[Image: 91767909_620706331816959_881817179980929...e=5EB2BCBB]
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#44
Information 
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Quote:[Only registered and activated users can see links Click here to register] and [Only registered and activated users can see links Click here to register] today announced a partnership to do just that. Your device will use Bluetooth to tell if you've been near someone that's tested positive for COVID-19, and both companies are going to introduce APIs that hook into official apps from public health authorities. You'll also be able to report through these apps if you've tested positive, and that way, people that have been near you can be alerted that they've been in contact with someone that has the virus.
 
The APIs will be available in May, but in the coming months, Bluetooth-based contact tracking will be built into the "underlying platforms", meaning iOS and Android. The firms did say that security and privacy are "central to the design", so you'll still have to opt in for this to work. Your phone isn't going to start tracking you (more than it already does) without your consent.
 
While there are certainly privacy implications to contact tracing, it's also one of the most effective ways to combat the spread of the COVID-19 coronavirus. It would allow you to know if you've come into contact with someone that has it, but only if that infected individual has opted in as well. Moreover, there might be a parallel between people breaking social distancing rules, and people that choose not to opt into the new service.
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#45
This is a good idea, based on everyone being honest. However, I think it is easier to operate to mark the location of the case as in China to remind the residents nearby. Anyone can open the map and check the situation in a certain area. By the way, do you need a contactless thermometer? I got one: [Only registered and activated users can see links Click here to register]
There are too many people selling fakes now. Fortunately, what I bought is authentic and reliable.
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#46
WHO says pandemic getting worse globally, urges countries to continue efforts

Quote:The World Health Organization on Monday warned against complacency and urged countries to continue their efforts to curb the spread of the novel coronavirus as the pandemic was getting worse globally, Reuters reported.

There are more than 71.21 lakh coronavirus cases worldwide. Covid-19 has killed over 4.06 lakh people, according to the Johns Hopkins University tracker.

WHO Director General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said that more than 1,36,000 cases were reported worldwide on Sunday, and this was the most in a single day so far. “More than six months into the pandemic, this is not the time for any country to take its foot off the pedal,” he said in an online briefing.

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Johns Hopkins University tracker
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COVID-19: WHO clarifies comments on asymptomatic spread

Quote:Studies show people with the coronavirus are most infectious just at the point when they first begin to feel unwell, World Health Organization (WHO) experts said on Tuesday (Jun 9).

This feature has made it so hard to control spread of the virus that causes COVID-19 disease, but it can be done through rigorous testing and social distancing, they said.

"It appears from very limited information we have right now that people have more virus in their body at or around the time that they develop symptoms, so very early on," Maria van Kerkhove, a WHO epidemiologist and technical lead on the pandemic, told a live session on social media.

Preliminary studies from Germany and the United States suggest that people with mild symptoms can be infectious for up to 8-9 days, and "it can be a lot longer for people who are more severely ill", she said.

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#47
Coronavirus vaccine: a bit of information and status

CNN's Health Correspondent, Holly Yan shares us rlevant information on COVID-19 vaccine.

When will a Covid-19 vaccine be available to the public?
No one's sure yet, but the target is sometime in early 2021. Vaccines in development around the world are in various stages of testing. Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said he's confident one of the vaccine candidates will be proven safe and effective by the first quarter of 2021.

Why does it take so long to develop a vaccine?
Vaccines have to go through multi-phase trials to make sure they're effective and safe. Typically, a vaccine takes eight to 10 years to develop, said Dr. Emily Erbelding, an infectious disease expert at the NIAID.

Here's how the process typically works:
First, a vaccine is usually tested in animals before humans. If the results are promising, a three-phase trial in humans will begin:

Phase 1: The vaccine is given to a small group of people to assess safety and, sometimes, immune system response. If things go well, researchers move on to:

Phase 2: This phase increases the number of participants -- often into the hundreds -- for a randomized trial. More members of at-risk groups are included. "In Phase II, the clinical study is expanded and vaccine is given to people who have characteristics (such as age and physical health) similar to those for whom the new vaccine is intended," according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.


What are the dangers of rushing the process?
History has shown that vaccines developed or distributed in a hurry can lead to unintended consequences:

-- In 2017, a rushed campaign to vaccinate about 1 million children for mosquito-borne dengue in the Philippines was stopped for safety reasons. The Philippine government indicted 14 state officials in connection with the deaths of 10 vaccinated children, saying the program was launched "in haste."

-- In 1976, the US was dealing with a novel swine flu outbreak. President Gerald Ford's administration ignored a warning from the World Health Organization and vowed to vaccinate "every man, woman and child in the United States" against the new virus. After 45 million people were vaccinated, researchers discovered a disproportionately high number of them -- about 450 people -- had developed Guillain-Barré syndrome

So how do we safely speed up the process?
"No vaccine is going to be put forward unless it's been checked out very thoroughly, both in terms of 'Is it safe?' and 'Does it protect you?'" said Collins, the director of the National Institutes of Health.
Scientists are trying to find safe ways of speeding up the typical processes.

Who's making the vaccines?
Dozens of research teams from around the world are working to develop or test coronavirus vaccines. As of early June, there were more than 120 candidate vaccines. "Because we have a number of these (trials), and they all use a different strategy, I am optimistic that at least one, maybe two, maybe three will come through looking like what we need," Collins said.

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